And So the Learning Continues

 

During a couple of decades of martial arts training, I found the most pivotal moment is a simple statement the sensei or teacher says in a low whisper to the person receiving their black belt. After 3-5 years of continuous physical and mental training, the sensei steps forward, hands the student their black belt and says " now I can begin to teach you". . . . and so the learning continues.


After spending 12 long weeks in United States Marine Corps boot camp, each Marine graduate is only prepared to assimilate into a highly disciplined military culture, not fight a war. Past boot camp more training is required. After graduating boot camp, I spent another year in electronics school, specializing in microwave and satellite communications.  Now I was ready to enter the "fleet Marine force". . . and so the learning continues.

After 4 years of college, a person only has a foundation to put their training into the "real world" environment. As many of us have found out, it ain't like it is in the books when we enter the job market, from college. Graduating from college is only the beginning . . . .and so the learning continues.

Although this may be a hard pill to swallow, looking for a job is relatively easier than maintaining position within an organization. Usually dictated by perceived economic conditions, the daily skirmishes within the office can be a grueling experience. How do we adapt, improvise and overcome? There is always that air of uncertainty. Anxiety lurks around every corner waiting to sneak up on us. Oh sure, latching on to an inside mentor or 2 has a place in guiding us through the paces. Is that really enough? Are we sure the information provided isn't self serving? Does the mentor always have our best interests in mind, since they work for the same organization we do? Do they give us all the business intelligence required to effectively maneuver around the organization?

One of the fallacies of coaching is people only hire one when they are looking for a job. That is only half the battle and provides a "band aid" approach to developing a Successful career. If a person is only interested in obtaining a job, instead of developing a successfully profitable career, then that coaching strategy may have some short lived validity. Moving from transition to employment is only the the beginning . . . and so the learning continues. Having a coach allows a person to schedule "ongoing" sessions to stay focused in achieving profitable career goals. More importantly, a seasoned coach provides strategies to avoid those daily situational corporate land mines. The best time to engage a Coach is when gainfully employed . . . and so the learning continues.

Copyright (c) 2004 - 2007 C. E. Reid, SAVVY INTRAPRENEUR